'Nones' Gain Most

People unaffiliated with any religion constitute nearly 20 percent of the American public, making them almost as numerous as Catholics, who accounted for 22 percent of the participants in a recent Pew Research Center study. The survey, released on Oct. 9, found that people who say they are atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” grew by almost 5 percentage points since 2007, from 15.3 percent of the population to 19.6 percent. The greatest shift toward “nothing in particular” apparently came from Protestants, who now make up 48 percent of the population, compared to 53 percent in 2007. “These are not necessarily nonbelievers,” said Greg Smith, senior researcher for the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. “They’re just not associated with any faith in particular.” The unaffiliated tend to be younger than the general public, the survey showed, with 35 percent between ages 18 and 29.

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Maybe you heard about the breakdancing priests. Seeing the video sparked memories of my own experiences at Steubenville.
Suzy PekarJuly 28, 2017
Charlie Gard died on Friday, July 28 after his parents gave up a protracted legal battle with a London hospital over whether he could be successfully treated in the United States for a rare genetic condition.
Working out for the body of a god? What about the body of a convict?
Zac DavisJuly 28, 2017
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., speaks with reporters ahead of a health care vote on July 27 on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate rejected legislation to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act, with McCain casting a decisive "no." (CNS photo/Aaron P. Bernstein, Reuters)
“We are relieved and delighted that the Affordable Care Act remains intact,” Sister Carol Keehan said. “We think that this is really an important moment now to hear the people on both sides of the aisle that have said we need to come together and work on making this better.”
Kevin ClarkeJuly 28, 2017