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A Vatican-convoked commission of doctors concluded that a healing attributed to Blessed John Paul II had no natural explanation, a finding that could clear the way for the canonization of the pope. • U.S. Army Chaplain Stephen McDermott was awarded the Bronze Star in April for his service in Afghanistan. • Francesco C. Cesareo, president of Assumption College in Worcester, Mass., was appointed the next chair of the National Review Board on April 11, a position he will assume at the end of June. • On April 19 Pope Francis canceled a stipend of more than $30,000 that was to have been paid to the five cardinals who supervise the Vatican bank. • Caritas Internationalis workers are struggling to reach remote communities in Sichuan, China. This suggests that the full extent of the 7.0 earthquake disaster on April 22 is yet to be seen. • Five people who protested U.S. drone policy last fall by blocking an entrance to the Hancock Field Air National Guard Base near Syracuse, N.Y., were found guilty of trespassing on April 18. • Christians around the world are uniting in prayer on May 11 for the end of violence in Syria.

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The Adorers of the Blood of Christ have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether their religious freedom rights were violated by the construction and pending use of a natural gas pipeline through its land.
Throughout the discussions leading up to the synod's final week, small groups "have been very specific and intentional that we don't become too Western with our approach."
In a statement issued a few minutes after the broadcast of a story from Radio-Canada investigating sexual abuse allegedly committed by 10 Oblate missionaries in First Nation communities, the Quebec Assembly of Catholic Bishops told of their "indignation and shame" for the "terrible tragedy of
Central American migrants depart from Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Oct. 21. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
Many of the migrants in the caravan are fleeing Central America’s “Northern Triangle”—El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. These countries are beset by “the world’s highest murder rates, deaths linked to drug trafficking and organized crime and endemic poverty.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 23, 2018