L.G.B.T. on Campus

A small independent Catholic college in Escondido, Calif., has joined the opponents of a state law that would ban discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students by depriving colleges of state and federal student-aid funds. The president of John Paul the Great University, Derry Connolly, said the bill would prevent some students from enrolling and the college from having policies in line with Catholic teaching and could force Catholic colleges to host same-sex weddings in campus chapels. The measure, known as S.B. 1146, has passed the state Senate Judiciary Committee and is expected to come before the entire legislature in August. It is intended to block state financial assistance, known as Cal Grants, and federal aid in the form of Pell Grants to colleges and universities the state says are discriminating against L.G.B.T. students.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Nicholas Clifford
2 years 5 months ago
I'm a a bit confused by this. Of course I haven't read California S.B. 1146 barring discrimination against LGBT students, but how could such a law possibly "prevent some students from enrolling" in this university? Perhaps President Derry fears that if the law passed some students would choose not to enroll there, but that's a different issue. As for the fears that the university might be forced to "host" same sex weddings in the college chapel, is that a realistic fear? Has, say, the University of San Diego, or Santa Clara University, or the University of San Francisco or any others in the Golden State (or elsewhere) had to deal with such requests? I'm puzzled.
Jim McCrea
2 years 5 months ago
The name of the "university" ... John Paul The Great (!) ... should answer all your questions.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Psychedelics can blur the line between science and spirituality—but Christian mysticism cannot be studied.
Terrance KleinJanuary 17, 2019
The extensive New York Times series in support of legal abortion unfolds as if the last 46 years of the abortion debate following Roe v. Wade never happened and did not need to.
​Helen AlvaréJanuary 17, 2019
In 1983, Sri Lanka descended into a bitter and prolonged ethnic conflict. Harry Miller, S.J., then almost 60, was thrust into a new role as witness, advocate, intermediary and protector not only for his students but for anyone in Batticaloa who sought his help.
Jeannine GuthrieJanuary 17, 2019
I have found that praying 15 minutes every day is an important form of self-care.
Michael R. Lovell January 16, 2019