In Jordan Little Hope For ‘Geneva II’ Success

In Jordan’s capital city, Amman, prayers for peace were being offered by refugee Syrian Christians as talks between the warring sides in Syria’s civil war opened in the Swiss town of Montreux. Dubbed Geneva II, the talks aim for a transitional government, an end to the violence and the delivery of badly needed humanitarian aid. Expectations among displaced Syrians for a peaceful outcome in Geneva were low, however. “Of course, the Geneva II talks must happen. But how will the extremist groups threatening Christians and other Syrians inside the country be dealt with?” asked Abu Reda, a Syrian Catholic. Church officials and rights groups say that many Christians have tried to remain neutral in Syria’s conflict. But fighting continues to put pressure on the small Christian population, leading to fears that more Syrian Christians will join those who have already left the Middle East.

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