Hope Against Human Trafficking

Speaking to judges and prosecutors at a Vatican summit on human trafficking and modern slavery on June 3, Pope Francis said, “You are responsible for executing justice,” the ones “called to give hope.” The pope had been given a warm welcome by some 100 judges and prosecutors from all over the world. They had spent the day sharing experiences dealing with cases of human trafficking and making proposals for national and transnational action to combat these crimes, which have made victims of an estimated 40 million men, women and children. After thanking them for the work they are doing in this field, often in difficult and sometimes dangerous circumstances, Pope Francis encouraged them “to fulfill their vocation and their crucial mission—to establish justice—without which there is neither order nor sustainable and integral development, nor social peace.” He emphasized the importance of their work in defense of “the dignity and freedom of men and women today” and in particular “to eradicate human trafficking and smuggling and the new forms of slavery such as forced labor, prostitution, organ trafficking, the drug trade and organized crime.” He denounced these forms of modern slavery as “real crimes against humanity.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

A young boy walks past a wall with graffiti urging people to wear face masks in Harare, on May 28. Manhunts have begun after hundreds of people fled quarantine centres in Zimbabwe and Malawi. Authorities worry they will spread COVID-19 in countries whose health systems can be rapidly overwhelmed. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
As under Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s contemporary political elite continue to trample on civil libertie with what the same disregard of censure from both local moral authorities and international human rights organizations.
Marko PiriJune 02, 2020
President Trump’s visit to the St. John Paul II National Shrine continues a pattern of using sacred sites for political stunts, writes America associate editor Zac Davis. This is over the line of what the church should tolerate.
Zac DavisJune 02, 2020
Archbishop Gregory: “I find it baffling and reprehensible that any Catholic facility would allow itself to be so egregiously misused and manipulated in a fashion that violates our religious principles.”
Here are five ways for Catholics to deepen their commitment to working against racism.
The EditorsJune 01, 2020