The Earth at Risk

On Nov. 3 Cardinal Peter Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, gave the keynote address at Santa Clara University’s two day conference on “Laudato Si’”: “Our Future on a Shared Planet: Silicon Valley in Conversation with the Environmental Teachings of Pope Francis.” Some of the cardinal’s most striking comments regarded a more integral development of technology. Cardinal Turkson noted the pope’s concern that “the more that people live through their digital tools, the less they may learn ‘how to live wisely, to think deeply and to love generously.’” As the Vatican makes a concerted effort to influence the outcome of the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Paris later this month, Cardinal Turkson told America that civil society and business leaders must play a role in the success of the meeting of world leaders. “It is not just now a matter of politicians and political leaders and policy makers meeting to decide anything,” he said. “But the awareness is now very well shared that the earth is at risk, and there is something that needs to be done to ensure that life on this earth is sustainable.”

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