Drug Abuse Dilemma

With Massachusetts facing a growing epidemic of opioid addiction, the state’s Catholic bishops urged in a statement released on March 2 that action be taken to quell the epidemic. “The abuse and misuse of opioids has become a national and local epidemic.... On average, four people lose their lives each day in this state, due to illegal and legal drug overdoses. It is a disturbing trend that must be stopped,” said the statement signed by Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley, O.F.M.Cap., of Boston, Bishop Robert J. McManus of Worcester, Bishop Mitchell T. Rozanski of Springfield and Bishop Edgar M. da Cunha of Fall River. The statement was issued through the Massachusetts Catholic Conference, the public policy arm of the Catholic Church in the commonwealth. In their statement, released on March 2, the bishops asked that health care providers “demand improved education within their own professional groups about the appropriate indications, prescriptions and use of opioid medications.” Additionally, they urged lawmakers to continue working on legislation to combat the opioid crisis.

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Robert O'Connell
2 years 4 months ago
What amazes me is how much we invest in minimizing fatalities due to auto accidents. Right now we seem to suffer more fatal overdoses than road fatalities! Yet, to some extent, the idea of "working on legislation to combat the opid medications" sounds tiresome: has legislation helped yet? Fatal drug overdoses are a symptom of a much bigger failure to "love our neighbor" more than any lack of "education" among health care providers. If we focused on helping families secure wholesome lives and making jobs available to everybody who wants one fewer people would be tempted to use or sell drugs.
Richard Booth
2 years 4 months ago
I agree, Robert. But, I think we should not forget that someone decided to take a first hit, a second hit, and so on, of street drugs. Personal responsibility must play a role here somewhere, at least in those cases in which an individual has the capacity for choice.

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