Condemning Terror

U.S. Catholic leaders and some of Iran’s top religious figures issued a joint declaration that calls for the end of weapons of mass destruction and of terrorism and of assigning blame for terrorist acts to an entire religion. “Christianity and Islam share a commitment to love and respect for the life, dignity and welfare of all members of the human community,” said the declaration, made public on Aug. 24. The declaration called the development and use of weapons of mass destruction and acts of terrorism immoral and called on all nations “to reject acquiring such weapons and call on those who possess them to rid themselves of these indiscriminate weapons, including chemical, biological and nuclear weapons.”

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