Church and Economy

Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga

The world financial system “has been built as a new idolatry,” charged Cardinal Óscar Rodríguez Maradiaga of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, at a forum on June 3 in Washington, sponsored by the Catholic University of America’s Institute for Policy Research & Catholic Studies. During his keynote address, Cardinal Rodríguez issued a ringing endorsement of the church’s competency to critique economic systems. Some of the church’s critics ask: “What is the hierarchy of the church doing in the economy? They know nothing about the economy,” Cardinal Rodríguez said in his remarks at the forum called Erroneous Autonomy: The Catholic Case Against Libertarianism. The church knows about the economy because “we know about the human being,” the cardinal said. “The human being was not made for the economy, but the economy was made for the human being.” He added that the market’s “invisible hand has become [a] thief.” Cardinal Rodríguez said political action may help change the ills of the current system. “Politics is often regarded as a dirty game,” he said. “Who else but committed Christians can clean it up?”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

So what does it matter what a celibate woman thinks about contraception?
Helena BurnsJuly 20, 2018
Former US President Barack Obama gestures to the crowd, during an event in Kogelo, Kisumu, Kenya, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo Brian Inganga)
In Johannesburg, Obama gave what some commentators consider his most important speech since he vacated the Oval Office.
Anthony EganJuly 20, 2018
With his "Mass," Leonard Bernstein uses liturgy to give voice to political unease.
Kevin McCabeJuly 20, 2018
Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington, arrives for the Jan. 6 installation Mass of Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
Women often “bring up the voice of those who are the most vulnerable in our society,” says Hans Zollner, S.J., who heads the Centre for Child Protection in Rome.