Cheap Fast Food?

Fast-food workers and supporters demand higher wages during rally in New York (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)

According to a study released on Oct. 22 by the University of California’s Berkeley Labor Center and the University of Illinois, more than half the nation’s fast food workers rely on public aid because their wages are not sufficient to support them. Fifty-two percent of families of fast food workers receive assistance from public programs like Medicaid, food stamps, the Earned Income Tax Credit and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the report said, at an estimated cost to taxpayers of $7 billion each year. A separate report criticized fast food giants McDonald’s, Yum! Brands, Subway, Burger King, Wendy’s, Dunkin’ Donuts, Dairy Queen, Little Caesar’s, Sonic and Domino’s for pushing their workers onto the public safety net. The National Employment Law Project said that these 10 largest fast food companies were responsible for more than half the total cost to taxpayers—about $3.8 billion a year. McDonald’s alone was responsible for $1.2 billion.

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Mike Evans
5 years 2 months ago
Now add virtually all your mall retailers and you have a snapshot of poverty stricken workers in America. They receive low minimum wages, less than full time hours, virtually no benefits and earn no pension rights. These workers can no longer claim to be in the middle class. Their employers rely upon food stamps, medicaid, unemployment insurance and housing vouchers to make up the difference while complaining bitterly about the ACA, minimum wage increases, and regulation of pension funds. This is class warfare in its ugly full presence.

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