Charleston Joins Other Rampages in Sorry History of U.S. Gun Violence

The images were riveting in the early hours Thursday morning: Residents shaken to the core in Charleston, S.C., holding hands and forming a circle of prayer down the street from what was another mass shooting in the U.S.

It has happened before in a kindergarten class, a college campus, a movie theater, a McDonald’s. The words resonate as places forever linked with the unspeakable: Sandy Hook, Columbine, Virginia Tech, Luby’s.

Advertisement

And this time it was a humble church, the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the oldest AME church in the South, where people had gathered for a prayer meeting Wednesday night.

“I do believe this was a hate crime,” Police Chief Gregory Mullen said after confirming that nine people were dead.

“This is a tragedy that no community should have to experience,” Mullen said. “It is senseless. It is unfathomable that someone would walk into a church when people are having a prayer meeting and take their lives.”

Said Charleston’s mayor, Joe Riley: “This is inexplicable …. It is the most intolerable and unbelievable act possible. The only reason someone could walk into church and shoot people praying is out of hate.”

Since 2006, there have been more than 200 mass killings in the U.S. The FBI defines a mass killing as an incident with four or more victims.

A USA TODAY special report, Behind the Bloodshed, documents that in the United States mass killings occur about every two weeks. Public massacres such as the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., account for one in six mass killings.

The report also documented how the majority of mass killings are family-related. Seventy-seven percent of mass killings involve a gun, and nearly three out of four guns involved were handguns, USA TODAY found.

One of the most stunning revelations in the report: A mass killing often involves a failed safety net: protective orders that didn’t work, gaps in the mental health system, lapses in immigration enforcement.

Here are some of the deadliest rampages in U.S. history:

• Dec. 14, 2012: Adam Lanza, 20, guns down 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School before killing himself.

• July 20, 2012: James Holmes allegedly guns down 12 people in an Aurora, Colo., movie theater. He is on trial.

• April 16, 2007: Seung Hui Cho, a 23-year-old student, goes on a shooting spree at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., killing 32 people, before killing himself.

• Oct. 16, 1991: George Hennard, 35, crashes his pickup through the wall of Luby’s Cafeteria in Killeen, Texas. He shoots and kills 23 people before committing suicide.

• Aug. 20, 1986: A part-time mail carrier, Patrick Henry Sherrill, shoots and kills 14 postal workers in Edmund, Okla., before killing himself.

• July 18, 1984: James Huberty, 41, guns down 21 adults and children at a McDonald’s in San Ysidro, Calif., before being killed by police.

• Aug. 1, 1966: Charles Joseph Whitman, a former U.S. Marine, shoots and kills 16 people from a university tower at the University of Texas in Austin before being shot by police.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Chuck Kotlarz
3 years 11 months ago
In 2015, gun deaths are expected to surpass traffic fatalities. Nine of the ten states with the most gun violence are republican dominant states. Traffic fatality rates in republican dominant states run twice that of democrat dominant states.

Advertisement

The latest from america

“One of the first things that dictators do is to remove the freedom of the press,” he said.
Gerard O’ConnellMay 18, 2019
The problem is not the priesthood; the problem is clericalism.
James Martin, S.J.May 17, 2019
“Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away” at the Museum of Jewish Heritage speaks to the horror of the Holocaust and the courage and determination of its survivors.
Emma Winters May 17, 2019
Anti war demonstrators hold banners as they protest outside Westminster Abbey, as a service to recognize 50 years of continuous deterrent at sea takes place in London on May 3. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Senior clerics of the Church of England joined politicians from the nearby Houses of Parliament to give thanks for the United Kingdom’s seaborne nuclear deterrent. A more ill-judged, if not blasphemous, event could hardly be imagined.
David StewartMay 17, 2019