A Celebration of Life

One day after Planned Parenthood’s president, Cecile Richards, spoke at Georgetown University, Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington celebrated a University Mass for Life for college students at a nearby Catholic church, encouraging them to stand up for God’s gift of human life. A Georgetown student group’s invitation to Richards, the head of the nation’s largest abortion provider, to speak on April 20 at the country’s oldest Catholic university drew nationwide criticism and was countered by a week of pro-life activities at the school. The events included panel discussions on the dignity of life and the importance of outreach to women facing crisis pregnancies. In his homily at the Mass on April 21 at Epiphany Catholic Church, Cardinal Wuerl warned about a powerful movement and environment of political correctness “all around us.... It says to set aside such things as the value of human life and substitute the politically correct position that actually you should be free to choose to kill the unborn child. But the word of God says to us, ‘Don’t conform yourself to this age.’”

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