Canada's House sends assisted suicide bill to Senate for approval

The Canadian government's assisted suicide legislation, which the nation's bishops describe as "fundamentally unjust" and an "affront to human dignity," easily passed third and final reading in the House of Commons May 31 and was sent to the Senate for final approval.

By a vote of 186-137, the House passed Bill C-14, which would legalize medically assisted death for mentally competent adults who, while not necessarily terminally ill, have a serious and incurable illness and are "suffering intolerably" and whose death is "reasonably foreseeable." 

Advertisement

The Catholic Register, Canadian weekly, reported the government rejected recommendations to extend assisted suicide to "mature minors" and to allow patients with degenerative diseases such as dementia to give advance consent. However, it said it would revisit those recommendations in coming months.

Under the new law doctors and nurse practitioners would be permitted to actively cause, or assist in, the death of a consenting, qualified patient without risk of criminal charges. 

Because of a 2015 Supreme Court ruling, a divided Senate had a June 6 deadline to give the bill royal assent. But asked if the deadline would be met, the Conservative leader of the Senate, Claude Carignan, told reporters, "no, no, impossible."

A Senate committee has already signaled dissatisfaction with the bill and suggested it could be sent back to the House of Commons for amendments. One objection of the committee is that although Bill C-14 provides conscience protection for doctors, it fails to extend that protection to religious health care institutions. More than 40 Senators have requested time to speak on the bill, and many are expected to propose amendments.

Bishop Douglas Crosby of Hamilton, Ontario, president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, has said that failure to provide explicit protection for health care providers could "potentially force the closure of hospitals operated under religious auspices, most of which are Catholic."

The bishops' conference "absolutely" and "categorically" objects to the legalization of euthanasia and assisted suicide. 

"Bill C-14, no matter how it may be amended, is an affront to human dignity, an erosion of human solidarity and a danger to all vulnerable persons," Bishop Crosby told a parliamentary committee.

Failure to enact a law by June 6 would see the Supreme Court ruling that overturned the ban on assisted suicide come into force without any federal legislation to regulate the practice. Health Minister Jane Philipott expressed concern that, without legislation, "there are not sufficient safeguards in place."

Lacking federal legislation, it would be left to provinces and medical regulators to govern the implementation of assisted suicide in their jurisdictions. That could create an uneven patchwork of regulations across the country, critics said.

Murray Rankin, justice critic for the New Democratic Party, predicted that, even if the bill becomes law, "it will be tied up in legal challenges for years to come."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged that likelihood.

"We understand that this is the beginning of a conversation that will go on for the coming years as court cases, evidence, concerns and doctors evolve in their thinking as we approach this," he told reporters.

"However, this is a big step. It needs to be taken right, and that is exactly what Bill C-14 does."

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
alan macdonald
1 year 4 months ago
Bishop Douglas Cosby should explain why Justin Trudeau, a Cradle Catholic, remains in good standing with the Church despite his murderous programs.
Richard Booth
1 year 3 months ago
It demands more than a consideration of recommendations when dealing with the "consent" of a moderately to severely demented person with respect to assisted suicide. Moreover, decisions of any type respecting this level of seriousness and termination requires the input of a board of competent mental health professionals, not merely nurse practitioners and physicians who may know very little about deteriorating mental conditions. There is an attempt now to teach attorneys about mental disorders, and the training should extend to medical people. The research shows most know very little about these matters. I am not in favor of the legislation nor of the methodology to be utilized in determinations of this type of end-of-life decisions. As a long-time psychologist, I wonder about the motivating factors underlying this legislation, given that neither politicians nor the average attending MD or NP are experts in the area of concern here.

Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

It is astonishing to think that God would choose to enter the world this way: as a fragile newborn who could not even hold up his own head without help.
Ginny Kubitz MoyerOctober 20, 2017
Protestors rally to support Temporary Protected Status near the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Sept. 26. (CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn)
Around 200,000 Salvadorans and 57,000 Hondurans have been residing in the United States for more than 15 years under Temporary Protected Status. But that status is set to expire in early 2018.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 20, 2017
At the heart of Anne Frank’s life and witness is a hopeful faith in humanity.
Leo J. O'Donovan, S.J.October 20, 2017
Forensic police work on the main road in Bidnija, Malta, which leads to Daphne Caruana Galizias house, looking for evidence on the blast that killed the journalist as she was leaving her home, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017. Caruana Galizia, a harsh critic of Maltese Premier Joseph Muscat, and who reported extensively on corruption on Malta, was killed by a car bomb on Monday. (AP Photo/Rene Rossignaud)
Rarely does the death of a private citizen elicit a formal letter of condolence from the Pope.