Bishops Slam Maduro

Venezuela's President Maduro talks with Archbishop Padron during meeting in Caracas.

In a hard-hitting statement released on April 2, Venezuela’s Roman Catholic Church accused President Nicolas Maduro’s government of “totalitarian” tendencies and “brutal repression” of demonstrators during two months of political unrest that has resulted in the deaths of 39 people. The bishops’ denunciation is likely to revive church-state tensions that were constant during the 14-year rule of Maduro’s predecessor, Hugo Chávez. Bishop Diego Padrón, who heads Venezuela’s conference of bishops, said the principal cause of the crisis was the government’s attempt to implement “the fatherland plan,” a blueprint for government that Chávez left behind. “Within it they are hiding the promotion of a totalitarian-style system of government, putting in doubt its democratic credentials,” he said, reading a church communiqué. Though it defended the right of students and others to protest, the church condemned both the demonstrators’ tactic of barricading roads and the state’s suppression of dissidence. “The government is wrong to want to solve the crisis by force,” the church statement added. “The solution is clear: sincere dialogue between the government and all sectors.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

An extraordinary minister of the holy Eucharist distributes Communion during Mass at Transfiguration Church in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, N.Y. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
According to a report released by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University on Jan. 22, just 33 percent of bishops in the United States think the church “should” ordain women as deacons.
Michael J. O’LoughlinJanuary 22, 2019

When the poet Mary Oliver died last week at the age of 83, my social media feeds blossomed into a field of tributes.

Lisa AmplemanJanuary 22, 2019
Most of the undocumented immigrants who are in the United States have overstayed a visa and did not cross the border illegally, according to a new analysis from the Center of Migration Studies.
J.D. Long-GarcíaJanuary 22, 2019
The church is my home because my home was a domestic church.
Katie Prejean McGradyJanuary 22, 2019