Elections in Egypt

Commenting on elections planned for Egypt on Nov. 28, Joannes Zakaria, the Coptic bishop of Luxor, said on Oct. 3 that Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis, conservative Muslims, appeared to be the most organized political groups. But, he said, “those who want a truly democratic regime that respects the rights of all” should have a strong say in the elections. “One has to keep in mind that since 1952, from Nasser’s revolution, until today, Egypt was ruled by a military regime that did not prepare society for democracy,” Bishop Zakaria said. “The main problem in Egypt today is political ignorance, for which everything ends up having a religious connotation,” he said. “This is true both for Christians and for Muslims. We all need to mature politically.” Bishop Zakaria said, “I would not have any problems to vote for a Muslim if I considered him appropriate for the office.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington, is pictured in a 2017 photo (CNS photo/Bob Roller) 
The case shows the mystifying complexity of the human person—or at least this human person.
James Martin, S.J.July 16, 2018
A front-page article published July 16 detailed the alleged abuse of two seminarians in the Diocese of Metuchen, New Jersey, by then-Bishop Theodore E. McCarrick.
Elsie Fisher (photo: A24)
Bo Burnham’s new movie is a joyous reminder that 13 is not, in fact, the best year of your life.
John AndersonJuly 16, 2018
A couple gets married in Stockholm, Sweden, in this 2013 file photo. (CNS photo/Fredrik Sandberg, EPA) 
“The right of Catholics to express disagreement with their leaders is a right as old as Peter and Paul.”
The EditorsJuly 16, 2018