Vatican Supports Two-State Solution

Addressing the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 27, a Vatican representative called for “courageous decisions” after Palestinian leaders appealed for statehood. Archbishop Dominique Mamberti, the Vatican’s secretary for relations with states, did not say whether the Vatican explicitly supported the Palestinians’ U.N. initiative. But he said the Vatican viewed the Palestinian bid “in the perspective of efforts to find a definitive solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian question—an issue addressed by a U.N. resolution in 1947 that foresaw the creation of two states. “One of them has already been created, while the other has not yet been established, although nearly 64 years have passed,” the archbishop said on Sept. 27. “The Holy See is convinced that if we want peace, it is necessary to adopt courageous decisions.” Archbishop Mamberti called on the United Nations to work with determination to achieve “the final objective, which is the realization of the right of Palestinians to have their own independent and sovereign state and the right of Israelis to security, with both states provided with internationally recognized borders.”

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta arrives in Osorno, Chile, on June 14, beginning a pastoral mission to promote healing in the wake of a clerical sexual abuse crisis. (CNS photo/courtesy of Archdiocese of Santiago)
The pope’s decision gives the Maltese archbishop the lead role in the fight against abuse in the church and in the protection of minors.
Gerard O’ConnellNovember 13, 2018
How do you pray? Do you kneel? Sit? Lie down?
James Martin, S.J.November 12, 2018
“This hypothesis—that the reality of personal sexual misconduct by bishops...was a factor which inclined some bishops not to vigorously pursue allegations of abuse among their clergy—I believe that this is a valid hypothesis.”
Kevin ClarkeNovember 12, 2018
Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, center, leads the opening prayer Nov. 12 during the fall general assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. Also pictured are Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of Los Angeles, vice president of the USCCB, and Msgr. J. Brian Bransfield, general secretary. (CNS photo/Bob Roller)
U.S. bishops tell the authors of a groundbreaking new book that they feel a duty to speak out on issues of the day, but they must tread carefully with a secular press and fallout from the sexual abuse crisis.