Bishops Calls for Support of Democracy Movement

Tunisia's tiny Catholic community prays for the country's transition to democracy and hopes that the nation will embrace full religious freedom, said Archbishop Maroun Lahham of Tunis. "We are certainly for the separation of 'mosque and state,' but we say clearly that a healthy democratic society must have as its foundation values that, whatever anyone says, have a religious root: freedom, respect, peace, equality, the preferential option for the poor, solidarity," the archbishop said. The archbishop wrote a pastoral letter on the attitude that Tunisia's 22,000 Catholics—all of whom are foreigners—should have toward the North African country's political and social changes. Tunisia's authoritative government was overthrown in January and a process of democratization began. For Christians, Archbishop Lahham said, the first wish "is to see the country finally arrive at a democratic regime. It is clear that a revolution is one thing, and a successful democratic transition is another." As part of a religious community that makes up less than 1 percent of Tunisia's population and is composed of noncitizens, Catholics in the country are called to be prayerful, supportive and humble witnesses of how God's spirit is at work, he said. "The vocation of the church is to love the world as God loves it, to see the world as God sees it," he said.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

The Adorers of the Blood of Christ have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether their religious freedom rights were violated by the construction and pending use of a natural gas pipeline through its land.
Throughout the discussions leading up to the synod's final week, small groups "have been very specific and intentional that we don't become too Western with our approach."
In a statement issued a few minutes after the broadcast of a story from Radio-Canada investigating sexual abuse allegedly committed by 10 Oblate missionaries in First Nation communities, the Quebec Assembly of Catholic Bishops told of their "indignation and shame" for the "terrible tragedy of
Central American migrants depart from Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Oct. 21. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
Many of the migrants in the caravan are fleeing Central America’s “Northern Triangle”—El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. These countries are beset by “the world’s highest murder rates, deaths linked to drug trafficking and organized crime and endemic poverty.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 23, 2018