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Thousands marched through Mexico City on May 8 calling for new public policies in the drug war and the end of violence that has claimed more than 36,000 lives. • The Anglican liturgist Rev. David Holeton said other Christians were “both stunned and dismayed” when the Vatican abandoned the English texts of prayers Catholics had developed with them since the Second Vatican Council. • Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington, D.C., took symbolic “possession” on May 8 of the Church of St. Peter in Chains, in Rome, home to Michelangelo’s sculpture of Moses. • An Indiana prosecutor dropped charges on May 5 against 94 people arrested for trespassing on the University of Notre Dame’s campus while protesting the invitation in 2009 to President Barack Obama to give that year’s commencement address. • On May 4 the House of Representatives approved a bill that would, among other measures, make the Hyde Amendment permanent, though it is not expected to succeed in the Senate. • The Rev. Mario Rodriguez, National Director of Pontifical Mission Societies in Pakistan, reports tension remains high after the killing of Osama bin Laden, but that churches and schools in Karachi have reopened and pastoral activities have returned to a normal pace.

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The Adorers of the Blood of Christ have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether their religious freedom rights were violated by the construction and pending use of a natural gas pipeline through its land.
Throughout the discussions leading up to the synod's final week, small groups "have been very specific and intentional that we don't become too Western with our approach."
In a statement issued a few minutes after the broadcast of a story from Radio-Canada investigating sexual abuse allegedly committed by 10 Oblate missionaries in First Nation communities, the Quebec Assembly of Catholic Bishops told of their "indignation and shame" for the "terrible tragedy of
Central American migrants depart from Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Oct. 21. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
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J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 23, 2018