States Diverge On Immigration

The Arizona Senate voted down five immigration bills on March 17 that proponents argued would crack down on illegal immigration even further than last year’s S.B. 1070, which is still suspended by court challenges. Meanwhile, Utah’s Gov. Gary Herbert on March 15 signed a series of bills that have been described as a state equivalent of the comprehensive immigration reform being sought at the national level. The measures step up enforcement but also create a guest worker program that itself is likely to face court challenges. Among the bills Arizona’s legislators rejected were some that would have required hospitals to verify patients’ legal status before admitting them for nonemergency care, required schools to collect data on immigration status and challenged the 14th Amendment’s provision for birthright citizenship. “All of the most problematic bills were defeated soundly on the Senate floor,” said Ron Johnson, executive director of the Arizona Catholic Conference.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

 10.17.2018 Pope Francis greets Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago before a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 16. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
“We take people where they are, walking with them, moving forward,” Cardinal Blase Cupich said.
Michael J. O’LoughlinOctober 20, 2018
Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018