Budget Priorities

The federal budget crunch should not be eased by cutting programs that help the poor, refugees and the unemployed in the United States or those struggling in developing nations, warned church leaders. “In a time of economic crisis, the poor and vulnerable are in greater need of assistance, not less,” said Bishop Stephen E. Blaire of Stockton, Calif., chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, in a letter to Congress on Feb. 14. A second letter from Ken Hackett, president of Catholic Relief Services, and Bishop Howard J. Hubbard of Albany, N.Y., chairman of the Committee on International Justice and Peace, noted cuts of up to 26 percent of funding in programs for international assistance this year, but only 2.6 percent in cuts for the overall budget. “Shared sacrifice is one thing,” said Hackett and Bishop Hubbard; “it is another to make disproportionate cuts in programs that serve the most vulnerable.” The Rev. Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA, urged policymakers to improve government efficiency before resorting to cuts.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Don't miss the best from America

Sign up for our Newsletter to get the Jesuit perspective on news, faith and culture.

The latest from america

Workers march in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Sept. South Africa's biggest union group held marches nationwide to protest what it alleges is chronic corruption fueled by President Jacob Zuma and a prominent family of businessmen, reflecting public anger over a scandal that has ensnared several international companies. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
The bishops “urge constitutional experts and the law reform commission to guide the nation on the feasibility of establishing an anti-corruption court, with specialized prosecutors, that would ensure speedy and efficient disposal of corruption cases and financial crimes.”
Russell Pollitt, S.J.October 19, 2017
“Goodbye, Christopher Robin” is a dramatic look at the life of the British writer A. A. Milne and his strained relationship with his son.
Haley StewartOctober 19, 2017
There are no epidurals for manuscripts.
Natalia Imperatori-LeeOctober 19, 2017
Photo by Beth Teutschmann on Unsplash
The ghost turnip, with its pinched angry face, was made for Halloween.