News Briefs

The Hong Kong Catholic Justice and Peace Commission joined human rights groups campaigning for the release of the Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, winner of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. • U.S. doctors announced on Oct. 11 that they have begun the first publicly known use of human embryonic stem cells, treating a patient at an Atlanta facility for victims of severe spinal cord injuries. • The Archdiocese of Los Angeles launched a creation sustainability ministry on Oct. 4 to inspire Catholics “to act out of reverence and respect for God’s creation.” • Khartoum police arrested a man subdued after rushing toward the altar with a dagger during a Mass celebrated by Khartoum’s Cardinal Gabriel Zubeir Wako on Oct. 11. • As scientists gathered in Detroit for the World Stem Cell Summit on Oct. 3, Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit said research that destroys human embryos “deserves our scrutiny and scorn.” • The president of Australia’s United Retail Federation has urged Pope Benedict to intercede against the Australian government’s decision to curtail the merchandising use of the name of the newly canonized Mother Mary MacKillop.

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An explosive device was detonated outside the offices of the Mexican bishops' conference, directly across the street from the country's most visited religious site, the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. walks from the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, as he steers the Senate toward a crucial vote on the Republican health care bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Republican proposals “exclude too many people, including immigrants,” Bishop Frank J. Dewane said in a statement.
Without quite knowing it, I had begun to rely on the tradition of the Roman Catholic Church.
Elizabeth BruenigJuly 25, 2017
A demonstration for affordable health care in New York City on July 13. Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, called on the Senate July 21 to fix problems with the Affordable Care Act in a more narrow way, rather than repeal it without an adequate replacement. (CNS photo/Andrew Gombert, EPA)
The sisters say that they are “most troubled by the cuts it would make to Medicaid by ending the Medicaid expansion and instituting a per capita cap [on spending].”