Public School Guidelines Issued for Catholic Parents

 

The California Catholic bishops’ conference is alerting parents and guardians of public school children that they have the right to “opt out” of many influences and classes that contradict their family’s values—from instruction in how to perform sexual acts to the ins and outs of witchcraft and the conjuring of spirits. The California Catholic Conference says most parents don’t realize they need to specifically fill out a form every year for every child and for every activity they find objectionable. At least nine of every 10 Catholic children in California attend public schools. Under California law, school districts are permitted to dismiss students in seventh grade and up for “confidential medical services,” without parental notification and without logging any absence. Those services can include AIDS testing or treatment, birth control or abortion.

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