Watching Out For Women Refugees

Caritas Internationalis highlighted the plight of three million women experiencing crisis as long-term refugees on World Refugee Day, June 20. Women refugees are particularly vulnerable to human rights abuses in cases where they have been forced to leave their homes for standing periods. Caritas said the international community can do better in protecting them from violence. There are over 10 million refugees in the world today. About two-thirds are caught in crises of five years or longer. Women make up 49 percent of the refugee population. They are frequently fleeing conflicts in places like Colombia, Sudan, Iraq and Afghanistan. “Women can become victims of violence in these camps,” said Martina Liebsch, Director of Policy for Caritas Internationalis. “They are more vulnerable to attacks, as they frequently have to leave the camps for basic supplies for their families, such as firewood and water.” Caritas says that better security in camps is essential, and that it should be made easier for women to report acts of violence.

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