Gulf States Wait For Recovery

While pundits and politicians observe the first signs of a spring thaw in the troubled economy of the United States, workers in Gulf South states are still waiting for signs that their lives will be better. According to a new report from the Pew Economic Policy Group, in the Gulf South the number of unemployed persons has more than doubled to 2,654,281 in February 2010 from 1,208,649 in February 2008. While Louisiana—still “benefiting” from hurricane recovery spending—and Texas continue to have unemployment levels below the national average of 9.7 percent, Florida (12.2 percent), Mississippi (11.4 percent) and Alabama (11.1 percent) endure rates that exceed the national level. Alabama has seen the greatest growth in unemployment—a 156 percent increase in just two years. Mississippi was not far behind with a 145 percent increase. Already, 3.5 million workers nationally have been out of work for more than a year, the highest number of workers idled for so long since World War II.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

This year’s W.Y.D takes place less than three months after the conclusion of the Synod for Young People that was held in the Vatican last October.
Gerard O’ConnellJanuary 21, 2019
On Jan. 18, a teenager wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat, center left, stands in front of an elderly Native American singing and playing a drum in Washington. (Survival Media Agency via AP)

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- An exchange between Catholic high school students and a Native American tribal leader in Washington Jan.

Like most public writers, I was used to getting notes that were crude, crazy or even mildly threatening. Normally, I would say a quick prayer for these obviously troubled people and get on with my day. This time it felt different, precisely because the author wasn’t insulting or obviously deranged.
Rachel LuJanuary 21, 2019
In cities across the country, local activists marched in support of a progressive agenda centered on economic justice, racial justice and immigrant rights.
Brandon SanchezJanuary 20, 2019