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Radio Soleil, the Catholic radio station in Haiti, resumed broadcasting on Jan. 24 from a makeshift studio in the back of a van parked in the hills above Port-au-Prince. • Working to ensure proper nutrition for all means bringing dignity to human lives and should be a top priority, Pope Benedict XVI said in a speech on Feb. 6 welcoming Alfonso Roberto Matta Fahsen, Guatemala’s new ambassador to the Vatican. • The costs of not enacting health care reform this year are “too dire” to permit that to happen, says Carol Keehan, a member of the Daughters of Charity who is president and chief executive office of the Catholic Health Association. • As the 30th anniversary of the murder of Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero approaches, El Salvador’s bishops have agreed to write a letter to the Vatican supporting Romero’s canonization in an effort to move the process forward. • St. Vincent’s, the last surviving Catholic general hospital in New York City, is enmeshed in a struggle to keep its doors open and fulfill its mandate to serve the sick poor. It inherited $700 million of debt after merging in 2000 with seven other Catholic hospitals in the metropolitan area.

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The Adorers of the Blood of Christ have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to decide whether their religious freedom rights were violated by the construction and pending use of a natural gas pipeline through its land.
Throughout the discussions leading up to the synod's final week, small groups "have been very specific and intentional that we don't become too Western with our approach."
In a statement issued a few minutes after the broadcast of a story from Radio-Canada investigating sexual abuse allegedly committed by 10 Oblate missionaries in First Nation communities, the Quebec Assembly of Catholic Bishops told of their "indignation and shame" for the "terrible tragedy of
Central American migrants depart from Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Oct. 21. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)
Many of the migrants in the caravan are fleeing Central America’s “Northern Triangle”—El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. These countries are beset by “the world’s highest murder rates, deaths linked to drug trafficking and organized crime and endemic poverty.”
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 23, 2018