2009 Tax Deduction Available for Haiti Relief

Under a new U.S. tax law, people who have donated to charities providing relief to Haitians since the Jan. 12 earthquake can take a tax deduction for the contribution on their 2009 tax return instead of their 2010 return. The measure was passed unanimously by the House Jan. 20 and by the Senate Jan. 21. President Barack Obama signed the bill into law Jan. 22. "This measure provides an immediate benefit for those who have already given and incentive for those who are considering a charitable contribution. We must do everything we can to help the people of Haiti and the aid workers working so feverishly on the ground to help them," said a statement released by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office on jan. 22. In 2004 Congress passed similar legislation for contributions to aid agencies helping the victims of the tsunami in Indonesia. An IRS announcement about the new law has been posted on the Web site www.irs.gov.

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