Jesus-Era House Brings Joy to Nazareth

Auxiliary Bishop Giacinto-Boulos Marcuzzo of Jerusalem said the Christian community in Nazareth was joyful at the recent discovery of the remains of a first-century dwelling. “This belongs to the time of Jesus and we can now see how [people lived],” said Bishop Marcuzzo, noting that the dwelling had remained largely intact throughout the ages. “The ruins...were not destroyed during history. There were lots of [wars and battles] which destroyed buildings, but that house was kept safe. Why? We don’t know why, but certainly there is a reason why that house was kept safe.” The remains are of “utmost importance” and reveal new information about how people lived during Jesus’ lifetime, said Yardena Alexandre, excavation director at the Israel Antiquities Authority. Earlier digs had revealed several tombs from the time period, but until the discovery of this house, no evidence of a human settlement had been uncovered. The structure was found next to the Basilica of the Annunciation, where the floor of a former convent was being removed to prepare for the construction of the International Marian Center of Nazareth.

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