Topics Identified for Apostolic Visitation

Orders of women religious in the United States will be asked to complete a comprehensive questionnaire that looks at six areas of religious life in preparation for a series of apostolic visits set to begin in January. Topics to be considered are outlined in a working document distributed on July 28 to 341 leaders of religious congregations of women. The topics are related to the life and operation of the orders: identity; governance; vocation promotion, admission and formation policies; spiritual life and common life; mission and ministry; and finances. Members of the orders are being asked to reflect on the working document. A separate questionnaire based on the working document will be distributed to superiors general on Sept. 1, marking the opening of the second phase of a comprehensive study of U.S. institutes of women religious. The study, ordered by the Vatican, was announced in January.

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