Honduran President Urged Not to Return

Deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya tried to return home on July 5, but was prevented from landing by soldiers who blocked the runway at Tegucigalpa’s airport. A day earlier, in a nationwide address Cardinal Oscar Rodríguez Maradiaga of Tegucigalpa urged Zelaya not to return to Honduras. “We think that a return to the country at this time could unleash a bloodbath in the country,” Cardinal Rodríguez said. “To this day, no Honduran has died. Please think, because afterward it will be too late.” Honduras’s new government has charged Zelaya with 18 criminal acts, including treason and failing to implement more than 80 laws approved by Congress since he took office in 2006. Zelaya was ousted in the early hours of June 28 when Honduran soldiers—acting on orders of the National Congress—shot up his house and took the pajama-clad president to the airport, where he was flown on a military plane to Costa Rica.

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