Victims Top Priority

Bishop-designate William Crean, appointed on Nov. 24 to Ireland’s Diocese of Cloyne, vowed he would make a priority of healing the pain caused by the sexual abuse scandal. Speaking at St. Colman’s Cathedral in Cobh, County Cork, he said he had mixed feelings about his appointment. “I am apprehensive because I am deeply conscious of the trauma of these years past—so much suffering endured by young people at the hands of a few—sufferings compounded by the failure of those who didn’t believe them and those who didn’t hear their cry for help,” he said. “I commit myself to do all that I can with others in the diocese to continue to bring healing and new hope to the lives of all victims of abuse and their families,” he said. Cloyne has been without a bishop since Bishop John Magee, a former secretary to three popes, resigned in 2010. A government inquiry had reported that Bishop Magee covered up allegations of abuse against priests in his diocese.

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