Communion With Nature

A joint statement produced by the dialogue in the United States between the United Methodist Church and the Catholic Church (co-chaired by Bishop Timothy Whittaker, Methodist, and Bishop William Skylstad, Catholic) calls members of both denominations to “participate more deeply in the Eucharist by recognizing its intrinsic connection with the renewal of creation.” The statement, Heaven and Earth Are Full of Your Glory, was issued on April 20 in anticipation of the traditional observance of Earth Day. “The Eucharist is regarded as the central form of Christian worship,” according to the statement, “because it orchestrates all that humans are and can be on this earth—our senses, abilities, talents, gifts, and intelligence—and offers them back to God the Father in thanksgiving for the Paschal victory of his Son.” The statement notes that elements of nature—grain for bread and grapes for wine—become part of salvation through the Eucharist and that salvation itself is an act of God at work in all of creation and all creation encountering God.

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