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James Martin, S.J.March 31, 2003

This series for Lent and Easter focuses on the world of devotions in the life of contemporary believers. America asked a number of writers, many of them younger Catholics, to speak about a favorite devotionits history, its place in the writer’s life and its possible role in the life of contemporary believers. In this fifth part of the series we look at two: lectio divina and Our Lady of Guadalupe.

 

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17 years 5 months ago
The series “Contemporary Catholics on Traditional Devotions” has been a welcome addition to my Lenten reflections this year, and I am grateful.

I was especially moved by Eric Stoltz’s “Our Lady of Guadalupe” (3/31). Recently it seems I am living in an alien world, where the evils of war, poverty, homelessness, injustice, discrimination and oppression by those in power can appear overwhelming. When I try to address (and redress) these issues, albeit on a very small scale, it sometimes feels hopeless. And it takes courage to be countercultural.

Our Lady’s message is a source of comfort and empowerment. Many thanks to Eric Stoltz for this beautiful reminder of her sustaining love and protection.

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