War in Afghanistan

At the opening of the war in Afghanistan, the editors raised serious questions about the legitamacy of the conflict:

The aerial attack by the United States on terrorist and Taliban targets in Afghanistan has been declared a just war by a number of Catholic leaders, including some bishops and cardinals. While we hope that the war is brought to a swift and just conclusion, such certitude, at this point, is hard to echo. There is no question that stopping terrorism is a just cause. But waging war under the just war doctrine must be the last resort, after diplomatic, economic and other means have failed. Was a month enough time to exhaust these options? This is unclear.

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Read the full editorial from October 29, 2001.

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N & T CHISHOLM
7 years 5 months ago
I opposed the war, the Afghan error, Iraq I and Iraq II and had cared for burned patients during the Soviet-Afghan war in April 1988 during our "covert" involvement. It was Ramadan, most of the patients were women. My understanding of Islam, Arabic Culture and Anthropology was minimal but much greater that my superiors to whom I reported after returning to base in Europe. Ah patriotism and propaganda!

I have been standing on Peace Corners for many years, can't engage my Pastors. The recent elections were silent on the wars despite the carnage, the cost and the dividends of death and wounded. Yet, this veteran of several wars was told how to vote in November. I haven't returned to Mass since. The current issue of America gives me some confidence including the revelation of a naive journalist following her skeptical visit to the Palistinian Gulag.

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