The Jesus of History: An archive of America's coverage

The search for the historical Jesus and what role it should play in the faith life of believing Christians is a subject of frequent discussion in the pages America. This week (Aug. 30-Sept. 6), Bernard Brandon Scott and Adela Yarbro Collins take up the question in their responses to Luke Timothy Johnson's article, "The Jesus Controversy." Editor Drew Christiansen, S.J. also weighs in his Of Many Things column.

Here we present a selection of our past coverage of the study of the historical Jesus:

Luke Timothy Johnson discusses "The Jesus Controversy" on the America podcast.

Daniel Harrington, S.J. reviews the latest installment of John P. Meier's A Marginal Jew, October 19, 2009.

Davd Gibson reports on the state of Catholic Bible study today, December 8, 2008.

Gerald O'Collins, S.J., assesses Pope Benedict's Jesus of Nazareth, June 4, 2007.

James Martin, S.J., comments on the unveiling of the Gospel of Judas, May 29, 2006. In an earlier Of Many Things column (March 17, 2003), Fr. Martin confessed his passion for historical Jesus scholarship.

Karen Barta reviews Elizabeth Fiorenza on Jesus and the Politics of Interpretation, September 24, 2001.

Elizabeth Johnson, CSJ, looks for Mary of Nazareth, June 17, 2000.

Gerald O'Collins summarizes "What They Are Saying About Jesus Now," August 27, 1994 (purchase required).

Plus, America reviews books by historical Jesus scholars N.T. Wright and Bart D. Ehrman.

Alison Garner
5 years 7 months ago
It will always be a timely topic! As for it doesn't matter what have happened and why people start to believe in God. I just want to know that there are a lot of people who believe in God and want to change this world!
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