Loading...
Loading...
Click here if you don’t see subscription options
Catholic News ServiceNovember 23, 2022
The pope, dressed in white garments, speaks into a microphone while seatedPope Francis, speaking at his weekly general audience Nov. 23, 2022, prayed for peace in Ukraine and remembered the millions of Ukrainian victims of the 1932-33 Holodomor, a Soviet-engineered famine. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)

Praying for peace in Ukraine, Pope Francis remembered both the victims of Russia’s current aggression and the millions of victims of a Soviet-engineered famine 90 years ago.

“Let us pray for peace in the world and an end to all conflicts, with a special thought for the terrible suffering of the dear and tormented Ukrainian people,” the pope said Nov. 23 at the end of his weekly general audience.

Speaking of Ukraine, he said, “next Saturday (Nov. 26) is the anniversary of the terrible genocide of Holodomor, the extermination by starvation artificially caused by (Josef) Stalin in Ukraine in 1932-33.”

Ukrainians mark Holodomor Memorial Day Nov. 26, especially with prayer services remembering the dead.

“Let us pray for the victims of this genocide and pray for so many Ukrainians -- children, women and the elderly, babies -- who suffer the martyrdom of aggression today,” the pope said.

Ukrainians mark Holodomor Memorial Day Nov. 26, especially with prayer services remembering the dead.

Ukraine has long been a major producer of grain. Stalin’s orders to collectivize farms in Ukraine and confiscate most of the grain led to the famine, which Ukrainians and many others believe was a deliberate attempt to destroy Ukrainian national identity after the formation of the Soviet Union.

Historians disagree on how many people died, although it is generally accepted that there were at least 3.5 million to 5 million victims. The website of the Holodomor Museum in Kyiv estimates at least 7 million people in Ukraine and 3 million Ukrainians in other regions of the Soviet Union were starved to death, but the numbers could be even higher because “the communist totalitarian regime did everything possible to conceal the consequences of its crime. It was forbidden to record the real number of deaths.”

The latest from america

On this week's episode of "Preach," Bishop Stowe shares how he connects the image of the Good Shepherd from the Gospels to the climate crisis.
PreachApril 15, 2024
Pope Francis gives his blessing to people gathered in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican April 14, 2024, for his midday recitation of the "Regina Coeli" prayer. The pope pleaded with nations to exercise restraint and avoid an escalation of violence in the Middle East. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
Pope Francis also appealed for a ceasefire in Gaza, the release of the hostages and the provision of humanitarian aid to the 2.3 million Palestinians living there,
Gerard O’ConnellApril 14, 2024
U.S. Catholics are more polarized than ever in how they view Pope Francis, even though majorities on both ends of the political spectrum have a positive view of the pope, according to a new survey.
In this special round table episode of “Inside the Vatican,” America Editor-in-Chief Father Sam Sawyer and the Executive Director of Outreach, America’s LGBT Catholic resource, Michael O’Loughlin, join host Colleen Dulle for a discussion on the document “Dignitas Infinita” and the pastoral
Inside the VaticanApril 12, 2024