Catholic News ServiceAugust 11, 2021
Cardinal Raymond L. Burke, then-prefect of the Supreme Court of the Apostolic Signature, arrives for a session of the extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- U.S. Cardinal Raymond L. Burke said he has tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

In an Aug. 10 tweet, he wrote: “Praised be Jesus Christ! I wish to inform you that I have recently tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. Thanks be to God, I am resting comfortably and receiving excellent medical care. Please pray for me as I begin my recovery. Let us trust in Divine Providence. God bless you.”

The 73-year-old cardinal, a native of La Crosse, Wisconsin, served as bishop of that diocese from 1995 to 2004, as archbishop of St. Louis from 2004 to 2008, and as prefect of the Vatican’s Apostolic Signature from 2008 to his resignation in 2014.

While the cardinal often resides in Italy, he travels extensively and was believed to be in Wisconsin at the time of the tweet.

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