The Letters

Discerning the call to celibacy

Re “Priestly Celibacy Today,” by Louis J. Cameli (5/27): This is a respectable presentation of the three dimensions considered. However, not all people are called to the celibate life. Formation itself does not and cannot make up for not being called to celibacy.  Yet I do not believe that not being called to celibacy dismisses the call to the priesthood. The church is being called to expand its vision of priesthood today. The early “priests” did not have to deal with this man-made invention.

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Mary Collingwood

 

The need to accompany the wounded

Re “U.S. Catholic leaders welcome new Vatican protocol on sex abuse accountability,” by Michael J. O’Loughlin (5/27): As a survivor, I watch and listen with open ears, straining to find positive outcomes to issues that have plagued me for 49 years, since I was 17. I believe with all my heart that survivors need healing centers, safe places to go to be among family, to be together during these explosive times. We need to understand what happened and how to recover from it—our families, too. I think this is a very good development. But we must not forget the walking wounded in our midst. We need a place. We need a healing center. Thank you for listening.

Sheila Gray

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[Explore America’s in-depth coverage of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.]

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