What part of the church’s healing are we each responsible for?

Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash

In the final episode of Deliver Us, we ask: What’s mine to do and not somebody else’s? What part of the church’s healing are we each responsible for?

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To grapple with these questions, we spoke to people who have responded to the sex abuse crisis in different ways. Geoff Boisi and Kerry Robinson talk about why they formed Leadership Roundtable, an organization which brings best business practices to church leaders and which has convened experts to discuss the church’s future. Leadership Roundtable has made it a priority to address the “twin crises” of the abuse crisis—one being the sexual abuse of children and vulnerable adults, and the other being the leadership failures in the church that have led to distrust.

Donna Doucette of Voice of the Faithful also joins the episode to offer her take on how lay people can contribute to healing, and Monica LaBelle offers her experience of setting up listening sessions in her parish.

We also hear from you, our listeners, in this final episode. You tell us what you’ve been doing to help the church move forward.

Links:

Leadership RoundtableVoice of the Faithful

Catholic Lay Response

Wounded Body of Christ: A Parish Discussion Guide on Abuse in the Catholic Church

In Spirit and Truth Blog

A Symposium on Responding to the Clergy Sexual Abuse Crisis - St. Mary’s Church in Hamilton, NY.

Fordham's Center on Religion and Culture

Renew International

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