How can we shift power in the church?

(CNS photo/Paul Haring)

This week’s episode takes on clericalism and the part it has played in the abuse crisis. What is clericalism and how can we recognize it when we see it?

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John Carr, director of the Initiative on Catholic Social Thought and Public Life at Georgetown University, talks to us about how he saw clericalism manifest in his conversations with the U.S. bishops. He talks about how the bishops are isolated, in part because of clericalism—and how that can contribute to abuses of power.

How is clericalism related to gender? Julie Rubio, a professor at the Jesuit School of Theology at Santa Clara University, joins the episode to offer her take, and speaks about how clericalism should be addressed in seminaries.

Theologian Richard Gaillardetz talks about who enables clericalism: It’s not just clergy.

Links:

#ChurchToo” by Julie Rubio
Eight lessons to help us move forward from the sex abuse crisis" by John Carr
To Serve the People of God” by Rick Gaillardetz

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
Nora Bolcon
4 months 4 weeks ago

Sexism is the main ingredient in clericalism. Clericalism demands exclusion to keep its strength. To be special when there is no reason to feel special, one must come up with a ready supply of people you can describe as less important than yourselves. This is why we defend misogyny at all cost in our church. Without the degradation of women by our heirarchy, they would have to prove themselves powerful and important through actual works of Christian grace and greatness and they fear they can't prove this strength since they didn't get accepted for these reasons and they fear many women can prove this at least as good and better than many men. So we can't discuss equal and same treatment and ordination despite the truth that this is exactly what Jesus Christ commands in every gospel as to how all believers must treat each other- The SAME. Jesus leaves no flesh bias as unsinful.

Dr.Cajetan Coelho
4 months 3 weeks ago

Priesthood is not clericalism, far from it. Clericalism needs to be rooted out or nipped in the bud before it shows its sheer ugliness.

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