Why you (yes you) should care about theology

You don’t have to have a Ph.D. in theology to write about religion (thank goodness)—but Tara Isabella Burton’s work shows it certainly doesn’t hurt. After getting her doctorate in theology at Oxford University, Tara became the first full-time religion correspondent for Vox (with a V she is quick to clarify). There she translates religious stories to a largely secular audience and brings a theologian’s lens to questions of public policy and values.

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Tara also published her first novel this year, Social Creature, a thrilling story about striving and sin in the decadent world of upper-class New York. We ask her about the book, how her own own faith has shaped her writing and why everyone should study theology.

Jesuitical is on vacation until August, so no Signs of the Times this week, but we still want to hear from you! Come share your consolations and desolations or some interesting Catholics news in our Facebook group. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org.

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