What is Your Lenten Resolution?

Larry Rodwell receives ashes from Father Paul Bonacci during an Ash Wednesday Mass at St. Pius X Church in Rochester, N.Y., Feb. 18. Ash Wednesday marks the start of Lent. (CNS photo/Mike Crupi, Catholic Courier)

What is your Lenten resolution or undertaking? Are you giving something up or taking something on? Does it involve food or drink? Are you making any particularly elaborate efforts to give alms, pray, and fast? 

I would appreciate reader input. I feel as though my Lenten promises are too routine, or too unimaginative. I'm hoping some crowdsourcing will freshen up my spiritual practice. Thank you in advance!

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Leslie McCaslin
3 years 9 months ago
I'm so glad I'm not the only one in a Lent rut! I gave up on giving up food or beverages because it was turning into more of a New Year's Resolution part 2, rather than a Lenten Devotion. This year I took up journaling about my Lent Journey, and while I haven't missed any days, and I'm doing spiritual readings and prayer (with charitable works and almsgiving) I'm not having any big spiritual aha! But maybe that's not what it's about. Maybe it's just about keeping this small promise, which to be perfectly honest, doesn't feel particularly sacrificial. Keeping this small promise may build me up to be able to keep the big ones too.
Bruce Snowden
3 years 9 months ago
Matt, A bit late but responding to your Lenten question, how about "giving in" rather than "giving up," meaning it's natural to want to win every time, so how about letting the "other person" maybe your wife, a student, anyone, "win" that argument. Who says we have to "win" all the time? "HUM" the happy tune of H-U-M-ility - for Lent guaranteeing for Easter the "empty tomb" of arrogance be it ever so subtle, so disguised, often with the super-assurance that "Daddy" ( however "Daddy" is shaped) knows best.

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