What Are the Urgent Questions?

In the life of faith, and in the life of an educator, it's not only answers that matter, but questions. The right questions can make all the difference. I think of the rich young man who came to Jesus and asked: "Teacher, what good must I do to gain eternal life?" Or of the lawyer who said to Jesus, "And who is my neighbor?" Or Pilate: "Are you the King of the Jews?" One of my favorite moments occurs after the calming of the storm at sea, when Jesus' apostles ask: "Who then is this, that even wind and sea obey him?" 

I'm curious for reader feedback: What questions do you bring to your prayer? How do questions play a role in your relationship with God?

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And what, today, do you believe to be the urgent questions in the life of faith?

 

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John Fitzgerald
3 years 10 months ago
I think the most fundamental question for any Christian is "Who do you say that I am?" Then the challenge is to live accordingly. For me, that simply amounts to trying to treat people I deal with during the day in a loving and kind manner. I offer three types of prayer every day. First, I thank God for the day, for my life, and for the gift of His Son. Second, I ask his blessing on a variety of people, whatever that might be. Finally and more recently, I ask for guidance on how I can be of greater service. So far, I have not discerned a more specific reply than treating others with love, kindness, and respect.

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