What's wrong with the teenage brain?

In "Ignatian Pedagogy: A Practical Approach," the authors write: "As teachers...we need to understand the world of the student, including the ways in which family, friends, peers, youth culture and mores as well as social pressures, school life, politics, economics, religion, media, art, music, and other realities impact that world and affect the student for better or worse."
 

One such reality of the "world of the student," at least the high school student, involves the brain—specifically, the growing and complicated cognitive development of teenagers. This recent piece in the New Yorker provides an excellent overview of this terrain, and offers much insight into why teenagers do what they do, why they take risks and ignore warnings and generally confuse and confound. An excerpt:

Every adult has gone through adolescence, and studies have shown that if you ask people to look back on their lives they will disproportionately recall experiences they had between the ages of ten and twenty-five. (This phenomenon is called the “reminiscence bump.”) And yet, to adults, the adolescent mind is a mystery—a Brigadoon-like place that’s at once vivid and inaccessible. Why would anyone volunteer to down fifteen beers in a row? Under what circumstances could Edward Fortyhands, an activity that involves having two forty-ounce bottles of malt liquor affixed to your hands with duct tape, be construed as enjoyable? And what goes for drinking games also goes for hooking up with strangers, jumping from high places into shallow pools, and steering a car with your knees. At moments of extreme exasperation, parents may think that there’s something wrong with their teen-agers’ brains. Which, according to recent books on adolescence, there is.

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