The Student as Sacramental Beholder

As we continue to reflect upon some of the foundations of Jesuit (and the broader landscape of Catholic) education, I want to share this illuminating thought from Fr. Michael Himes of Boston College. It's another excellent thought for reflecting on the nature of the Catholic academic enterprise: 

The entirety of Catholic liturgical life—indeed, of Catholic spiritual, intellectual, and ethical life—is geared toward producing sacramental beholders, people who see what is there in its full depth. That should sound familiar to educators. Is it not true in every field, whether we teach philosophy or chemistry, literature or finance, that we strive to lead people to see what is there to be seen? I am suggesting that the Catholic sacramental principle supports this with the conviction that what is there to be seen in its depth is grace. Consequently, to teach any discipline or field is a holy activity. All teaching can produce sacramental beholders, even when the teachers do not know that this is what they are doing. And I suggest to you that sacramental beholders are what Catholic universities and colleges are supposed to be producing.

 

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