Stephen Prothero in the WSJ: Schools Should Stop Honoring Religious Holidays

Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Stephen Prothero of Boston University critiques the proliferation of religious holidays, which, he says, are becoming excessive. Speaking of an inter-faith calendar he received for Boston area chaplains, he noted:

There were birthdays to celebrate—for atheist Bertrand Russell, for scientologist L. Ron Hubbard and for the Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie revered by Rastafarians. There were also death days and new years days and days of feasting and fasting. Was I really supposed to excuse Mormon students on Pioneer Day? And Baha’i students on the day of the ascension of their founder, Baha’u’llah?

This hyper-inclusive calendar came to mind when New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the nation’s largest public-school system had decided to add two Islamic feast days, Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr, to its days off. Why stop there? Why not the winter solstice for Wiccans? Or Festivus for worshipers of Saint Seinfeld?


What's the problem with this? Read the rest here.  

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J Cosgrove
3 years ago
Christmas is an official holiday of the United States of America. It is written into law. This must frost de Blasio.


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