LMU Study: Catholic Schools Help Those in Poverty

The School of Education (SOE) at Loyola Marymount University (the Jesuit university of Los Angeles) has released a new study that provides encouraging news about the value of Catholic education. From the official press release:

The study, conducted by SOE's Center for Catholic Education, followed a group of nearly 600 students who entered Los Angeles Archdiocesan high schools in 2008 with tuition assistance from the Catholic Education Foundation. Researchers found that 100 percent of those students, who came from families living at or below the poverty line, graduated high school and 96 percent were accepted into either two- or four-year colleges.

By comparison, the high school graduation rate in the same year was 79 percent for California public school students and 67 percent for Los Angeles Unified School District students. Comparable college acceptance and attendance data for public and charter schools are not available.

Advertisement

View the full report here.

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement

The latest from america

Psychedelics can blur the line between science and spirituality—but Christian mysticism cannot be studied.
Terrance KleinJanuary 17, 2019
The extensive New York Times series in support of legal abortion unfolds as if the last 46 years of the abortion debate following Roe v. Wade never happened and did not need to.
​Helen AlvaréJanuary 17, 2019
In 1983, Sri Lanka descended into a bitter and prolonged ethnic conflict. Harry Miller, S.J., then almost 60, was thrust into a new role as witness, advocate, intermediary and protector not only for his students but for anyone in Batticaloa who sought his help.
Jeannine GuthrieJanuary 17, 2019
I have found that praying 15 minutes every day is an important form of self-care.
Michael R. Lovell January 16, 2019