Leonard Sax to Parents: Protect Your Child

A participant uses an Apple iPad during the Catholic Press Congress at the Vatican Oct. 4. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) (Oct. 4, 2010) See PRESS-MISSION Oct. 4, 2010.

As readers of this blog know, I've addressed some of the ways that students are harming themselves and others through the destructive use of Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of social media. These same concerns were the subject of a controversial op-ed in yesterday's Wall Street Journal.

The author of the op-ed is Dr. Leonard Sax, M.D., Ph.D., a physician and psychologist well known for his books in the area of educational psychology and adolescent development (his Why Gender Matters should, in my opinion, be required reading for teachers). In his WSJ piece, Dr. Sax discussed sexting, online bullying and other device-enabled behaviors that cause depression, emotional collapse or, in some cases, suicide. Speaking of one incident where a 12-year-old began to cut herself and talk of killing herself, Dr. Sax asked, "Who is to blame in this situation?"

Advertisement

His answer: 

I blame their parents. The parents provided their kids with cellphones capable of taking, sending and receiving photographs, but they provided no oversight. 

I go around the country talking about this issue, and I'm always surprised when parents express reluctance about deploying software to monitor all the devices their children use. There are widely available programs, such as My Mobile Watchdog, Mobile Spy and Net Nanny Mobile that send any photo your child takes or receives on her phone immediately to your phone and laptop, even before your child has sent the photo anywhere.

The rest of Sax's article is available here.  

Have any readers used the programs that Dr. Sax suggests? If so, do you have any comments on their effectiveness?

Related Posts:

Update: Felony Counts in Florida Bullying

It Tolls for Thee

The Newest Threat to Good Teaching

Saving Students on Social Media

Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.
jattbook .com
4 years 11 months ago
free sign up now http://www.jattbook.com/ WWW.JATTBOOK.COM JattBook Provide To You Share News,Discussions,Questions, Polls,Social Networking ,Chat, Links and More About Each Others

Advertisement

The latest from america

 10.17.2018 Pope Francis greets Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago before a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 16. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)
“We take people where they are, walking with them, moving forward,” Cardinal Blase Cupich said.
Michael J. O’LoughlinOctober 20, 2018
Catherine Pakaluk, who currently teaches at the Catholic University of America and holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, describes her tweet to Mr. Macron as “spirited” and “playful.”
Emma Winters October 19, 2018
A new proposal from the Department of Homeland Security could make it much more difficult for legal immigrants to get green cards in the United States. But even before its implementation, the proposal has led immigrants to avoid receiving public benefits.
J.D. Long-GarcíaOctober 19, 2018
 Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, then nuncio to the United States, and then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington, are seen in a combination photo during the beatification Mass of Blessed Miriam Teresa Demjanovich at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Newark, N.J., Oct. 4, 2014. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz)
In this third letter Archbishop Viganò no longer insists, as he did so forcefully in his first letter, that the restrictions that he claimed Benedict XVI had imposed on Archbishop McCarrick—one he alleges that Pope Francis later lifted—can be understood as “sanctions.”
Gerard O’ConnellOctober 19, 2018