Gratitude Meets Anxiety

I'm late to this, but I very much appreciated this reflection, from Brendan Busse, S.J., at The Jesuit Post, on his efforts to work through academic anxiety, which so often–doesn't it?–spills into larger worries and doubts. He writes: 

I couldn’t overcome the sense that what felt like a very poor performance meant that I was a total fraud, that I’d never pass as a priest, and that I was a fool to think it possible in the first place. Maybe I don’t know what I need to know. Maybe I don’t believe what I need to believe. Maybe that whole ‘falling in love’ thing was just a cruel joke. Maybe this wasn’t meant to be. Many good relationships end this way, with a sense of betrayal or inadequacy, with a bullying one-two punch to the gut: Who do you think you are? You should have known better.
 
Anxious self-doubt manipulates the truth with needless worry and endless projection. The antidote to this anxiety is to stop narrating what should be and to express gratitude for what is, to give attention to the present and the real.
With the new academic year only a few weeks away, I am thankful for these honest words and encourage you to read the rest of Brendan's moving essay.  
Comments are automatically closed two weeks after an article's initial publication. See our comments policy for more.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The latest from america

Migrants, consisting of mostly women and children, who disembarked from a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement bus, wait for a Greyhound official to process their tickets to their next destination at a bus station in Phoenix May 29. (CNS photo/Samantha Sais, Reuters)
The “Catholic Removal Impact Survey of Society” surveyed 133 deportees to provide insights into the effects of deportation on immigrants and their families.
J.D. Long-GarcíaNovember 13, 2018
I love this man who expressed his love with deeds and whose last deed will likely be his slipping away from me.
Robert I. CraigNovember 13, 2018
As wild and wonderful as Marvel Comics characters’ superpowers might be, their back stories are always grounded in reality.
Jim McDermottNovember 13, 2018
Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta arrives in Osorno, Chile, on June 14, beginning a pastoral mission to promote healing in the wake of a clerical sexual abuse crisis. (CNS photo/courtesy of Archdiocese of Santiago)
The pope’s decision gives the Maltese archbishop the lead role in the fight against abuse in the church and in the protection of minors.
Gerard O’ConnellNovember 13, 2018