Fr. Robert Barron on Martyrdom and the Cross

A supermoon is seen above a cross on a church in Jerusalem Sept. 9 (CNS photo/Ammar Awad, Reuters).

In light of the massacre of Coptic Christians, Fr. Robert Barron, at RealClearReligion, offers a powerful reflection on the meaning of the cross and the witness of martyrdom. An excerpt:

The cross was, basically, state-sponsored terrorism, and it did indeed terrify people. The great Roman statesman and philosopher Cicero once described a crucifixion but only through a convoluted circumlocution, for he couldn't bring himself to characterize it directly. After putting down the great slave uprising of Spartacus, the Roman government lined the Appian Way with hundreds of crosses so as to dissuade any other would-be revolutionaries. Pontius Pilate had much the same intention when he nailed dozens of Jewish rebels to the walls of Jerusalem. That same Pilate arranged for Jesus to be crucified on Calvary Hill, a promontory situated close to one of the gates of ancient Jerusalem, guaranteeing that his horrific death would not be missed by the large Passover crowds moving in and out of the city.
 

From the crucified Jesus, all of the disciples, save John, fled, precisely because they wanted with all their hearts to avoid his dreadful fate. After Good Friday, the friends of Jesus huddled in terror in the Upper Room, petrified that they might be nailed up on Calvary as well. The disciples on the road to Emmaus were, understandably, heading out of Jerusalem, away from danger, and they were utterly convinced that Jesus's movement had come to naught. In a word, the cross meant the victory of the world, and the annihilation of Jesus and what he stood for.

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