Fr. Greg Boyle, S.J. at "On Being"

Father Gregory Boyle founded Homeboy Industries in 1988 to provide jobs and hope for former gang members.

The public radio program "On Being," as its website says, "opens up the animating questions at the center of human life: What does it mean to be human, and how do we want to live? We explore these questions in their richness and complexity in 21st-century lives and endeavors."

"On Being" is a fantastic program that summons the intellectual delight of a favorite college humanities class while also introducing audiences to some of today's profoundest explorers of the terrain of soul. Recently, "On Being" featured Fr. Greg Boyle, S.J., founder of Homeboy Industries and author of Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion. Click here to listen to Krista Tippett's interview of Fr. Boyle.  

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